Serving the Community Since 1956

Serving the Community Since 1956

Friday, May 30, 2014

Stop the Fat Talk



Fat talk.  We've all done it.  We have all looked in the mirror at one time or another and said negative things about our physical appearance.

In fact, we probably do it so often that we don't even notice it anymore.

We pinch our bellies and grumble about our thighs rubbing together and look at the dimples on the backs of our legs in disgust for years. We say it in our heads, we share it with our girlfriends, and even when our partners complement our bodies, we argue with their assessment. We do it so often that it seems totally normal.

But it's not.

We aren't made to be filled with self-hatred, self-loathing and negative self-talk; yet somehow it has become completely acceptable to be our own worst enemy.
So how can you stop this kind of talk?  How can we go from bashing our bodies on a regular basis to thinking more positively and replacing those negative thoughts with loving ones? Start with these four strategies.

1. Recognize that you and your body are completely unique. 
You were born with a completely unique genetic makeup and predispositions to certain physical attributes. You can influence some physical characteristics with your lifestyle, but some things simply can't be changed.  (Learn more about how your genes affect your jeans size.)

But you know what's really cool?  You hit the genetic lottery.  Yep, it's true.  Every single one of us hit the genetic lottery in something. Maybe you have gorgeous hair, or a stunning smile, or a killer wit.  So what if you don't have six-pack abs or "perfect" legs?  I can guarantee you have some pretty special qualities.

Maybe it's harder for you to lose fat or gain muscle than your best friend or your co-worker, and that can be frustrating.  But maybe they are coveting your awesome squat form or your ability to run 20 sets of bleachers without breaking a sweat.

Action step: Find your own sweet spot where your health, lifestyle, performance and aesthetics intersect. It might not look like anyone else's—and that's just how it should be.

2.Set goals that aren't about losing weight.
For most people, losing body fat is their number one goal related to their health, fitness or appearance.  If you have excess fat to lose, that's a great goal to have.  However, somewhere along your fat-loss journey you will hit an inevitable and frustrating plateau during which your weight loss stalls or stops completely.  This plateau may last a few weeks, or it may last significantly longer than that.

The problem?  When your goal is body fat loss, and you're struggling (and sometimes failing) to achieve it, it encourages negative thinking and fat talk.  You're constantly focused on what you don't like about your body and how it's not changing.  You'll start to think that you're not dedicated enough, not good enough, or not working hard enough.

Setting goals that aren't directly related to fat loss can be much more positive and encouraging (and psst: they often lead to fat loss indirectly!).  Plus, it's good to focus on something other than weight, especially if you tend to obsess or get down about what the scale says.

Action step: Choose one short-term goal (2-3 months away) and one long-term goal (6-12 months away) that aren't about weight, and commit to them fully.  When you've achieved them, acknowledge that you've achieved them and allow yourself to feel very proud.

3.Stop and ask yourself, "Would I say that to someone I love?"
You've probably heard the saying, "We are our own worst critics," and it's so true.  We say things to ourselves that we would never ever say to someone we love.

We tell ourselves that we are fat, disgusting, gross, worthless, and hopeless.  We tell ourselves that we will never achieve our goals, that we quit everything we start, that we aren't worthy of being happy or loved.

It rarely sounds crazy or mean in our own heads, but when we see it in writing, it's easier to understand just how harmful that self-talk can be. With that kind of feedback, how could anyone succeed?

Action step: Start becoming more aware of your thoughts and internal monologue. Next time you catch yourself saying something negative to yourself, ask: Would you say that to your mother? Your sister? Your best friend? Your daughter?  If the answer is no, then do not say it to yourself.

Develop a positive mantra that you can repeat to yourself until the negative thoughts are replaced with positive thoughts.  Something as simple as, "I am beautiful and worthy," works perfectly.

4.Recognize that your thoughts and words impact everyone around you.
It's very easy to forget how much we affect the people around us. This is especially true with impressionable young children (especially girls). Some research shows that girls as young as five years old already have body dissatisfaction and express a desire to be thinner.

Where do they get these ideas? Sure, there are societal and media influences even at that age, but most often, they hear others (including their moms, sisters, grandmothers, aunts, etc.) talk negatively about their own bodies. Those flippant comments you make about your thighs, the way you react after stepping on the scale, and even your physical discomfort and shameful body language when wearing a bathing suit—kids pick up on all of this.

So how do we recognize and turn around a lifetime of self-destructive behavior?

Action step: STOP immediately any time you notice negativity floating through your head or coming out of your mouth.  If you catch yourself saying something negative in front of a child, talk about it. Point out that it's not nice to say negative things about anyone including ourselves. Explain that we should be kind to ourselves just like we try to be to others.

Remember, you are beautiful and worthy right this moment.  Not 10 pounds from now.  Not two sizes from now.  Not two months of calorie-counting from now. Right now.  It's time you recognize this, and treat yourself like the amazing person you are. You deserve it.


Source:  http://www.sparkpeople.com/blog/blog.asp?post=4_tips_to_stop_the_fat_talk_for_good

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Take a Walk



Improve your health by increasing your physical activity. Start with walking more as part of your daily routine.

Most everyone knows that physical activity is important for good health, but not enough actually do it. Obstacles abound, not the least of which is limited time. Fitting regular physical activity into your daily schedule may seem difficult at first, but the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans are more flexible than ever, giving you the freedom to reach your physical activity goals through different kinds of activities. It's easier than you think!

Adults need two types of physical activity each week—muscle strengthening and aerobic. Aerobic activities make you breathe harder and make your heart and blood vessels healthier. Brisk walking is the most popular aerobic physical activity among adults in America.

Walking briskly for 2 hours and 30 minutes each week— easily broken up into 5, 30-minute walks—helps you meet the Physical Activity Guidelines and gain health benefits. Add in 2 days that include muscle strengthening activities—things like sit-ups, push-ups or weight lifting—and you are one of the growing number of adults getting healthier by increasing their physical activity. Congratulations!

Join the crowd.

More and more Americans are choosing walking as their regular form of physical activity each day. More than 145 million adults now include walking as part of a physically active lifestyle. So if you’re not as active as you would like, why not consider walking more each day?

Walking is free, requires no special skills or facilities, and can be done indoors and outdoors—alone or with others.

Every step counts.

Increasing physical activity is an important step towards a healthier life. People who are physically active can live longer and have a lower risk for heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, depression, and some cancers. Even if you are inactive, you can benefit from becoming active. Doing some physical activity is better than none.

Commit to walking more each day than you did the day before.

Here are a few tips for adding more walking into your day.
  • Park the car further from your destination and walk to all your nearby errands.
  • Find a walking buddy. Meet at the same time most days to go for a brisk walk.
  • Host a Walking Meeting—walk and talk over problems with your colleagues for the first 20 minutes then hit the conference room to write down ideas and finish up.
  • Make a Walk-and-Talk date with a friend or family member. Skip the latte and do a loop around the neighborhood instead.
  • Take a walking lunch break at work. Keep extra shoes and socks in your filing cabinet.
  • Walk while you are waiting. Instead of sitting on the bleachers while your child’s at practice, walk around the field. Walk outside the restaurant as you wait for your table to be ready.
  • Find a convenient walking path near your home, kids’ activities, or work.

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

A Healthy Heart


Many of us have treadmills at home. Some gather dust, some serve as a clothes rack and others get a little use. Sometimes it is just not very engaging to be on your treadmill at home by yourself. This piece of equipment can serve a great purpose, especially if you have had a cardiac event and need to rehabilitate. Two local residents have joined with 30 others and participate in the Cardiac Rehabilitation Maintenance program at Mayers Memorial Hospital.

 
 
Marty Horn and Bob Downey both agree it is hard to be accountable when you are doing it alone. “Misery loves company,” joked Horn, who has participated in the program four days a week for 13 years. He went on to say that the association with others with similar problems is a great support system. It is also an enjoyable social time.

Downey has gone to the program four days a week for the past six years. He says that he spends two hours per visit and only half of that time is on equipment. “The other half is social time. It is great fellowship and the fringe benefit has been developing many new friendships.”

What is the Cardiac Maintenance? If you have had cardiac stent replacement, cardiac bypass, heart attack, chest pain, valve repair or replacement this program may be for you. Most insurance will pay for 36 visits of cardiac rehabilitation. Following that treatment you can enroll in the maintenance program for a self-pay fee of only $35 per month – unlimited use.

Horn and Downey both concur that the level of care and staff assisting in the program is exceptional. Manager, Trudi Burns is “exceptional and watches you like a hawk,” said Downey.  Burns and her staff monitor the exercise program, take vitals and provide the encouragement needed.
 

Downey, who will have his 90th birthday this year, said he doesn’t exercise at home. “I go to the program at Mayers four days a week as a part of my routine. It is important to have my routine and I can tell if I back off from it. I think this is a great program that contributes to my health. I tell a lot of people about it.”

The department has bicycles, treadmills, arm ergometer, stairs, weights workout videos and cardio-fit machines. A nurse is present to monitor heart, blood pressure and oxygen levels. The program is offered Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday of each week from 7:00 am to 2:00 pm. For more information, contact the department at (530)336-5511 Extension 1178.

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

May - National Stroke Awareness Month

Every year, more than 795,000 people in the United States have a stroke. Although stroke is a leading cause of serious long-term disability, a quick response when the stroke occurs can help minimize brain damage and shorten the recovery period.

Take the time to learn the signs and symptoms of stroke during May, which is National Stroke Awareness Month. A 2005 CDC survey found that only 38% of people could correctly identify all 5 symptoms of stroke and knew to call 9-1-1 if they thought that someone was having a stroke.
The key to recognizing a stroke is knowing the following signs and remembering that they occur suddenly:
  • Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially on one side of the body.
  • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking, or difficulty understanding speech.
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes.
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance, or lack of coordination.
  • Sudden severe headache with no known cause.

Photo: Cell phone with 911 on screen

What to Do? Act FAST

If you think someone may be having a stroke, act FAST and do the following simple test:
  • F—Face: Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?
  • A—Arms: Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?
  • S—Speech: Ask the person to repeat a simple phrase. Is their speech slurred or strange?
  • T—Time: If you observe any of these signs, call 9-1-1 immediately.
Note the time when any symptoms first appear. Some treatments for stroke must be given within the first few hours after stroke. Do not drive to the hospital or let someone else drive you. Call an ambulance so that medical personnel can begin life-saving treatment on the way to the emergency room.

resource: cdc.gov

Monday, May 26, 2014

The Burning Truth

Burning Truth logo 

A lot of people believe indoor tanning is safe. The truth is, tanning beds injure thousands of people each year badly enough to go to a hospital, and that's just the beginning. People who indoor tan damage their skin, often getting wrinkles, warts, rashes, and dark spots. They may even get skin infections, cataracts in their eyes, and—most dangerous of all—skin cancer, including deadly melanoma.

Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States, and unlike almost all other kinds of cancer, the rates are climbing. This is definitely not a trend you want to follow. Avoiding indoor tanning and protecting yourself from the sun when outdoors are the best ways to reduce your chance of getting skin cancer.

The Burning Truth communication initiative encourages you to keep your skin healthy and beautiful for life by protecting yourself from too much exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun and tanning beds.

Know the Burning Truth about these tanning myths—

A Base Tan Is Not a Safe Tan. There is a common misconception that a tan acts as the body's natural protection against sunburn. The Burning Truth: A tan is the body's response to injury from UV rays, showing that damage has been done. A "base tan" only provides a sun protection factor (SPF) of about 3 or less, which does little to protect you from future UV exposure.

Tanned Skin Is Not Healthy Skin. Some people believe the tanning bed gives them a "healthy glow." The Burning Truth: Whether tanning or burning, you are exposing yourself to harmful UV rays that damage your skin. In fact, every time you tan, you increase your risk of melanoma. The truly healthy glow is your natural skin color.

Controlled Tanning Is Not Safe Tanning. You may have heard that indoor tanning is the safer way to tan because you can control your level of exposure to UV rays. The Burning Truth: Sensible indoor tanning is a myth. Indoor tanning exposes you to intense UV rays, increasing your risk of melanoma—the second most common cancer in women between 20 and 29 years old.


Resource: cdc.gov

Friday, May 23, 2014

Stand Up Tall




Correct Posture Month encourages people to think about how posture can affect their overall health. Posture refers to the position a person's body is in whilst they are sitting or standing.

Sedentary activities such as sitting, reading, playing video games, using a computer sedentary activities and more physical activities like gardening, bending or lifting objects, are often performed with poor posture.

Poor posture can negatively impact a persons health. Back problems are an obvious result of poor posture with back pain being the most common problem. Side effects from medicines used to control back pain can have a huge impact on a persons physical and mental well being.

Poor posture can affect our health in other ways too. For example, slouching can give rise to jaw pain and headache. Poor posture places more strain on the muscles and joints and can lead to arthritis. Poor posture can also affect breathing, and impair both the circulatory and digestive systems.

A popular method of making a person aware of the importance of good posture is by using photography to capture images of a person whilst they are standing. Three images of a person are normally taken (front, side and back) which are then analyzed to see if the body is in alignment. Poor posture can be shown when the head is forward whilst the back is flat, or whilst the head is forward with shoulders rounded and a sway back.

In reality, it is very difficult to achieve perfect posture all the time. However there are healthcare professionals such as chiropractors who can assist us and there are simple exercises we can do which can help.

To improve posture when standing, keep your head held up, shoulders back and stomach tucked in.
When sitting, keep the legs bent 90 to 120 degrees perpendicular to the floor, buttocks touching the back of the chair, with weight evenly distributed over both hips. Feet should be flat on the floor. When sitting at a table or desk, have the arms and elbows rest on the surface taking the strain off the shoulders.

Avoid sitting for long periods of time; get up every 30 minutes. (Editors tip: whilst working at a desk, I have a glass of water available. Hydrating regularly helps with concentration; regular trips to the toilet help prevent sitting at a desk for a long time.).

Attention should also be paid to the position we are in when we are sleeping and lying down. Sleeping on your front can cause back and neck strain as can sleeping on your side with your knees bent up high near the chest.

A position which maintains the curve of the back is encouraged. This can be achieved by sleeping on your side with knees slightly bent, or by lying on your back and placing a pillow under knees. A lumbar support placed near the lower back can also help to make you become more comfortable.
Exercise such as yoga and Pilates can assist in balancing the muscles of the body. When the body's muscles are balanced, less energy is spent fighting gravity. As less strain is put on the skeletal system the negative effects of bad posture can be avoided or at least reduced.

Advantages of good posture.

  • Extra height - up to 3 inches of our natural body height can be lost with poor posture. With good posture, we can regain our full height.
  • Fatigue Prevention - good posture means the body is using muscles more efficiently, meaning less energy is being spent keeping the body in position.
  • Prevention of strains, back ache and muscular pain.
  • Prevention of wear on the joints and less strain on the body's ligaments.
  • Prevention of secondary complications such as arthritis and impairment of circulatory and digestive systems.
  • Improved appearance - people with good posture, carry themselves in a more natural manner and generally look better than those whose posture is out of balance.

Source: whathealth.com

Thursday, May 22, 2014

COPD

 
For more information about COPD and treatment, contact the Respiratory Therapy Department at Mayers Memorial Hospital District.
(530)336-5511 Extension1226

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

What is Arthritis?

Arthritis is very common but is not well understood. Actually, “arthritis” is not a single disease; it is an informal way of referring to joint pain or joint disease. There are more than 100 different types of arthritis and related conditions. People of all ages, sexes and races can and do have arthritis, and it is the leading cause of disability in America. Nearly 53 million adults and 300,000 children have some type of arthritis. It is most common among women and occurs more frequently as people get older.
Common arthritis joint symptoms include swelling, pain, stiffness and decreased range of motion. Symptoms may come and go. They can be mild, moderate or severe. They may stay about the same for years, but may progress or get worse over time. Severe arthritis can result in chronic pain, inability to do daily activities and make it difficult to walk or climb stairs. Arthritis can cause permanent joint changes. These changes may be visible, such as knobby finger joints, but often the damage can only be seen on X-ray. Some types of arthritis also affect the heart, eyes, lungs, kidneys and skin as well as the joints.

There are different types of arthritis:

Degenerative arthritis. Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. When the cartilage – the slick, cushioning surface on the ends of bones – wears away, bone rubs against bone, causing pain, swelling and stiffness. Over time, joints can lose strength and pain may become chronic. Risk factors include excess weight, family history, age and previous injury (an anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL, tear, for example).
When the joint symptoms of osteoarthritis are mild or moderate, they can be managed by:
  • balancing activity with rest
  • using hot and cold therapies
  • regular physical activity
  • maintaining a healthy weight 
  • strengthening the muscles around the joint for added support
  • using assistive devices 
  • taking over-the-counter (OTC) pain relievers or anti-inflammatory medicines
  • avoiding excessive repetitive movements
If joint symptoms are severe, causing limited mobility and affecting quality of life, some of the above management strategies may be helpful, but joint replacement may be necessary.
Osteoarthritis can prevented by staying active, maintaining a healthy weight, and avoiding injury and repetitive movements.

Inflammatory arthritis. A healthy immune system is protective. It generates internal inflammation to get rid of infection and prevent disease. But the immune system can go awry, mistakenly attacking the joints with uncontrolled inflammation, potentially causing joint erosion and may damage internal organs, eyes and other parts of the body. Rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis are examples of inflammatory arthritis. Researchers believe that a combination of genetics and environmental factors can trigger autoimmunity. Smoking is an example of an environmental risk factor that can trigger rheumatoid arthritis in people with certain genes.
With autoimmune and inflammatory types of arthritis, early diagnosis and aggressive treatment is critical. Slowing disease activity can help minimize or even prevent permanent joint damage. Remission is the goal and may be achieved through the use of one or more medications known as disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). The goal of treatment is to reduce pain, improve function, and prevent further joint damage.

Infectious arthritis.  A bacterium, virus or fungus can enter the joint and trigger inflammation. Examples of organisms that can infect joints are salmonella and shigella (food poisoning or contamination), chlamydia and gonorrhea (sexually transmitted diseases) and hepatitis C (a blood-to-blood infection, often through shared needles or transfusions). In many cases, timely treatment with antibiotics may clear the joint infection, but sometimes the arthritis becomes chronic.

Metabolic arthritis. Uric acid is formed as the body breaks down purines, a substance found in human cells and in many foods. Some people have high levels of uric acid because they naturally produce more than is needed or the body can’t get rid of the uric acid quickly enough. In some people the uric acid builds up and forms needle-like crystals in the joint, resulting in sudden spikes of extreme joint pain, or a gout attack. Gout can come and go in episodes or, if uric acid levels aren’t reduced, it can become chronic, causing ongoing pain and disability.

Diagnosis
Arthritis diagnosis often begins with a primary care physician, who performs a physical exam and may do blood tests and imaging scans to help determine the type of arthritis. An arthritis specialist, or rheumatologist, should be involved if the diagnosis is uncertain or if the arthritis may be inflammatory. Rheumatologists typically manage ongoing treatment for inflammatory arthritis, gout and other complicated cases. Orthopaedic surgeons do joint surgery, including joint replacements. When the arthritis affects other body systems or parts, other specialists, such as ophthalmologists, dermatologists or dentists, may also be included in the health care team.

Living With Arthritis
There are many things that can be done to preserve joint function, mobility and quality of life. Learning about the disease and treatment options, making time for physical activity and maintaining a healthy weight are essential. Arthritis is a commonly misunderstood disease. The Arthritis Foundation is the only nonprofit organization dedicated to serving all people with arthritis. Its website, arthritis.org, has many resources for learning about arthritis, practical tips for daily living and more.

Resource: Arthritis Foundation

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

May is Asthma Awareness Month

Asthma is one of the most common lifelong chronic diseases. There are 25.5 million Americans living with asthma, a disease affecting the lungs, causing repeated episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and coughing.

Although asthma cannot be cured, it is possible to manage asthma successfully to reduce and prevent asthma attacks, also called episodes. Successful asthma management includes knowing the warning signs of an attack, avoiding things that may trigger an attack, and following the advice of your healthcare provider.

Using what you know about managing your asthma can give you control over this chronic disease. When you control your asthma, you will breathe easier, be as active as you would like, sleep well, stay out of the hospital, and be free from coughing and wheezing. To learn more about how you can control your asthma, visit CDC's asthma site.

Badge: May is Asthma Awareness Month. Take action to help America breathe easier.
Asthma affects people of all ages and backgrounds. In most cases, we don't know what causes asthma, and we don't know how to cure it. Certain factors may make it more likely for one person to have asthma than another. If someone in your family has asthma, you are more likely to have it. Regular physical exams that include checking your lung function and checking for allergies can help your healthcare provider make the right diagnosis.

With your healthcare provider's help, you can make your own asthma management plan so that you know what to do based on your own symptoms.

Use your asthma medicine as prescribed and be aware of common triggers in the environment known to bring on asthma symptoms, including smoke (including second-hand and third-hand cigarette smoke), household pets, dust mites, and pollen. Limit or avoid exposure to these and other triggers whenever possible.

The important thing to remember is that you can control your asthma.

To learn about how CDC supports state asthma control programs, see our Success Stories from CDC’s National Asthma Control Program, National Center for Environmental Health, Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects.

Monday, May 19, 2014

National EMS Week


National EMS Week, May 18-24, recognizes and honors the hundreds of thousands of emergency medical services (EMS) practitioners around the country. Now in its 40th year of celebration, EMS Week is a time for national appreciation of the daily life-saving service that EMS practitioners provide to their patients, and an acknowledgement of the important role of EMS in our nation's healthcare system.



National EMS Week was first authorized by President Gerald Ford in 1973. A lot has changed since then, and the role of EMS in our nation's healthcare system is changing fast. Today, EMS responds to a wide range of emergency medical conditions (including trauma, stroke and cardiac arrest) through first response, field medical response, and medical transport. EMS practitioners conduct nearly 25 million transports per year (predominantly by ground, but also by air), which represents more than 8% of the U.S. population.

EMS saves lives and is a unique and critical part of the healthcare delivery system. In every community in our nation, EMS is expected to deliver quality emergency medical care on a 24/7 basis to their residents, as part of a continuum of healthcare services provided to all patients with emergency medical conditions. EMS is very often a patient's entry into the healthcare system, resulting from an acute care episode. And with the new healthcare focus on improving patient outcomes and lowering costs, EMS is now collaborating with other healthcare providers to help navigate patients to the right care, in the right setting, at the right time.

Mayers Memorial Hospital District is proud of an amazing EMS Staff. Thank you for all of your dedication!

Friday, May 16, 2014

Keep Your Children Active



Parents, Get Your Children Moving!

Extracted from an article on the Center for Disease Control and Prevention website

Summer is approaching, so how do you keep your school aged child busy and active?

Children benefit from being physically active and involved in organized activities. Active children tend to be more confident, have a greater sense of well-being, experience better health and be less involved in risky behaviors such as tobacco and drug use. Since 1980 the number of children who are overweight has doubled.




Why Children Aren’t Moving
There are many factors contributing to sedentary (inactive) behavior. Research shows that children watch four hours of TV per day, replacing time that could be spent doing positive activities. These children tend to have greater body fat than those who watch less than two hours per day.


Many children are choosing to spend their time sitting down in front of a TV, computer or video game, rather than outside playing with friends and family.



How Parents Can Help?
Children can’t get moving alone. Obstacles such as access to transportation, family commitments and the need for adult supervision keep many kids from having the chance to participate in activities. Children need support from their parents to find activities that are right for them – and to make activity an important part of their daily lives.

In today’s busy world, finding time for activity can be difficult, but it’s important. Here are a few things one can do:
¾Start by talking with other parents about physical activity
¾Organize a rotating schedule with friends and family that allows you all to share supervision or provide transportation to the group of children in your neighborhood
¾Ask your children what they like to do and are interested in trying
¾Help your children find programs where they can enjoy activities and spend time with youth who have similar interests
¾Participate in activities with your children and support their interests


Experts offer additional ways that parents can engage children in activity:

¾Encourage children to be moderately active for at least 60 minutes on most days of the week
¾Be physically active role models
¾Set limits on the amount of time the family watches TV and plays video games
¾Don’t allow a TV in your child’s bedroom
¾Create family activities that involve physical activity such as hiking, walking or playing
with a ball
¾Volunteer to help your children’s after-school physical activity programs
¾Build activity into your daily life: walk to the corner store and take the stairs



Benefits of Activity
Participation in physical activity decreases the risk of developing heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and colon cancer.


For Summer activity ideas:

http://www.parenting.com/article/fun-things-to-do-summer

http://workathomemoms.about.com/od/Summer-Activities-For-Kids/tp/Outside-Activities-For-Kids.htm


Information from an article by Janet Collins, Ph.D., Acting Director Division of Adolescent and School Health National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

30-Day Free Trial

 
 
A Healthy Heart
Many of us have treadmills at home. Some gather dust, some serve as a clothes rack and others get a little use. Sometimes it is just not very engaging to be on your treadmill at home by yourself. This piece of equipment can serve a great purpose, especially if you have had a cardiac event and need to rehabilitate. Two local residents have joined with 30 others and participate in the Cardiac Rehabilitation Maintenance program at Mayers Memorial Hospital.
Marty Horn and Bob Downey both agree it is hard to be accountable when you are doing it alone. “Misery loves company,” joked Horn, who has participated in the program four days a week for 13 years. He went on to say that the association with others with similar problems is a great support system. It is also an enjoyable social time.
Downey has gone to the program four days a week for the past six years. He says that he spends two hours per visit and only half of that time is on equipment. “The other half is social time. It is great fellowship and the fringe benefit has been developing many new friendships.”
What is the Cardiac Maintenance? If you have had cardiac stent replacement, cardiac bypass, heart attack, chest pain, valve repair or replacement this program may be for you. Most insurance will pay for 36 visits of cardiac rehabilitation. Following that treatment you can enroll in the maintenance program for a self-pay fee of only $35 per month – unlimited use.
Horn and Downey both concur that the level of care and staff assisting in the program is exceptional. Manager, Trudi Burns is “exceptional and watches you like a hawk,” said Downey.  Burns and her staff monitor the exercise program, take vitals and provide the encouragement needed.
Downey, who will have his 90th birthday this year, said he doesn’t exercise at home. “I go to the program at Mayers four days a week as a part of my routine. It is important to have my routine and I can tell if I back off from it. I think this is a great program that contributes to my health. I tell a lot of people about it.”
 
The department has bicycles, treadmills, arm ergometer, stairs, weights workout videos and cardio-fit machines. A nurse is present to monitor heart, blood pressure and oxygen levels. The program is offered Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday of each week from 7:00 am to 2:00 pm. For more information, contact the department at (530)336-5511 Extension 1178.

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

It's Legislative Season

Mayers CEO, Matt Rees with Assembly Member Dr. Richard Pan, 9th District, Chair of Assembly Health Committee


 

Mayers Memorial Hospital District (MMHD) CEO, Matt Rees has been busy lately with a number of legislative events. Spring is the legislative season in Sacramento, a time when new bills and proposed ballot measures are on the top of the agenda. Rural healthcare is always an important issue and a hands-on; grassroots approach is in the best interest of a small facility like MMHD.

Rees recently testified before the Assembly Health Committee regarding AB1805. The bill requires the Department of Healthcare Services to disregard the 10% payment reductions for Medi-Cal providers.

Prior to testifying, Rees met with Dr. Richard Pan, Assembly Health Committee Chair to discuss the best approach. Rees represented the California Hospital Association on this matter.  AB1805 passed the committee unanimously and is currently awaiting the next step.

This is just one of many efforts during this legislative season. Rees, along with other staff and board members have attended legislative days hosted by Association of California Hospital Districts (ACHD), California Hospital Association (CHA) and other advocacy groups.

Last year proved that grass roots efforts and small communities could have a large impact. MMHD has been repeatedly recognized within CHA for efforts in leading the way to the success of AB900, which saved many skilled nursing facilities throughout the state. Rees said the community and employees of the hospital played a significant role in the success of that legislation.



Monday, May 12, 2014

It's Hospital Week










 
 
 
National Hospital Week is May 6-12 and is celebrated in recognition of healthcare employees who work hard every day to make a difference in the lives of our patients and their families.
“Our employees are dedicated to providing compassionate care and are committed to ensuring our patients receive high quality care every day,” said Matt Rees, chief executive officer at Mayers Memorial Hospital District. “They represent our hospital in the best possible way, and I am very proud of the work they do.”

Since 1921, hospitals across the country have been celebrating National Hospital Week and inviting their communities to join in saying thank you to the extraordinary people who care for our friends and families.
Everyone has had some sort of experience in a hospital, so while the goal of National Hospital Week is to promote awareness, it is more important for us to focus on professional pride.  “I see firsthand what goes into the daily operations of a hospital, and I am proud to say that it is the team of people who work in a hospital that make it great.  From the physicians who diagnose and treat patients, to the nurses who provide comfort and medical care, to all the staff in the entire hospital who are behind the scenes to the environmental crews who keep our hospital clean, it is the people who make a difference.” Rees added.
 
A hospital is more than a place where people go to heal, it is a part of the community that fosters health and represents hope. From providing treatment and comfort to the sick, to fixing broken bones, hospitals are central to a healthy community.  The nation’s largest health care event, National Hospital Week was originated when it was suggested by a magazine editor who hoped a community wide celebration would alleviate public fears about hospitals. The celebration, launched in Chicago, succeeded in promoting trust and goodwill among members of the public and eventually spread to facilities across the country.
 
Mayers Memorial Hospital District has been serving the Intermountain Community since 1956 and employees over 200 people. 
 
 
 
 





 

 
 

 

Friday, May 9, 2014

We Have Telemedicine Services

 
 
Are you in need of a specialty physician? Mayers Memorial Hospital District can help. The Telemedicine Department is up and running and offers a variety of physician specialists from UC Davis.
 
 
Save time, travel and the stress of leaving your local area. With a referral from your regular physician, you can set-up a teleconference appointment with a specialist.
 
 
For more information, contact MMHD Telemedicine Department at (530)336-5511 Ext. #4100.
 
 


Thursday, May 8, 2014

How Safe are E-Cigs?


Chocolate, caramel, strawberry and bubble gum….who doesn’t love these flavors?  How tempting would something having those yummy smelling flavors be for a small child to play with?  These are just a few of the wide range of candy and fruit flavors that are available in  electronic cigarette nicotine cartridges.  Perhaps because of these “yummy” flavors, the CDC reports that poison control calls rose from one per month in September 2010 to 215 per month in February 2014 with more than half of the calls involving children under the age of 5. These poisonings occurred in one of three ways:  by ingestion, inhalation or absorption through the skin or eyes. So, what exactly are these yummy temptations?



Electronic cigarettes, also called “e-cigarettes”, were introduced to the U.S. in 2007 as an alternative to smoking tobacco.  They are readily available online and in shopping malls and are not currently required to be childproof.  Most “e-cigs” are similar enough in appearance to be mistaken for regular cigarettes, but don’t contain tobacco.  Instead, they have a battery-operated mechanism that heats up liquid cartridges filled with nicotine, flavor and other chemicals which turns into a vapor that smokers inhale and exhale.  Sounds harmless enough, doesn’t it?  Both the FDA and CDC aren’t so sure that this is, in fact, the case.

The FDA is concerned that the side effects of inhaling pure nicotine have yet to be studied, and are therefore unknown.  The amount of nicotine in an e-cigarette comes in varying strengths - from those found in an ultra-light cigarette to those found in a regular tobacco one.  While e-cigarettes don’t produce second-hand smoke, they do produce second-hand vapors that the FDA has tested and found to have known carcinogens and toxic chemicals in them.  Some individuals with health conditions that make them very sensitive to these vapors have reported irritation to their eyes, nose and throats as well as nausea and breathing difficulties. 

So, are e-cigarettes as safe as manufacturers and users would have us believe?  Or, are they a healthier option or a riskier choice?  Only you can decide.

Submitted By: Kathy Duncan, RN, IP

Wednesday, May 7, 2014

Happy Nurses Week

It is National Nurses Week! At MMHD, our nursing staff is dedicated to providing compassionate and quality care. Thank you to each and every one of your for your dedication to our patients and community!


National Nurses Week History

National Nurses Week begins each year on May 6th and ends on May 12th, Florence Nightingale's birthday. These permanent dates enhance planning and position National Nurses Week as an established recognition event. As of 1998, May 8 was designated as National Student Nurses Day, to be celebrated annually. And as of 2003, National School Nurse Day is celebrated on the Wednesday within National Nurses Week (May 6-12) each year.



The nursing profession has been supported and promoted by the American Nurses Association (ANA) since 1896. Each of ANA's state and territorial nurses associations promotes the nursing profession at the state and regional levels. Each conducts celebrations on these dates to recognize the contributions that nurses and nursing make to the community.

The ANA supports and encourages National Nurses Week recognition programs through the state and district nurses associations, other specialty nursing organizations, educational facilities, and independent health care companies and institutions.

A Brief History of National Nurses Week

1953 Dorothy Sutherland of the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare sent a proposal to President Eisenhower to proclaim a "Nurse Day" in October of the following year. The proclamation was never made.

1954 National Nurse Week was observed from October 11 - 16. The year of the observance marked the 100th anniversary of Florence Nightingale's mission to Crimea. Representative Frances P. Bolton sponsored the bill for a nurse week. Apparently, a bill for a National Nurse Week was introduced in the 1955 Congress, but no action was taken. Congress discontinued its practice of joint resolutions for national weeks of various kinds.

1972 Again a resolution was presented by the House of Representatives for the President to proclaim "National Registered Nurse Day." It did not occur.

1974 In January of that year, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) proclaimed that May 12 would be "International Nurse Day." (May 12 is the birthday of Florence Nightingale.) Since 1965, the ICN has celebrated "International Nurse Day."

1974 In February of that year, a week was designated by the White House as National Nurse Week, and President Nixon issued a proclamation.

1978 New Jersey Governor Brendon Byrne declared May 6 as "Nurses Day." Edward Scanlan, of Red Bank, N.J., took up the cause to perpetuate the recognition of nurses in his state. Mr.



Scanlan had this date listed in Chase's Calendar of Annual Events. He promoted the celebration on his own.

1981 ANA, along with various nursing organizations, rallied to support a resolution initiated by nurses in New Mexico, through their Congressman, Manuel Lujan, to have May 6, 1982, established as "National Recognition Day for Nurses."

1982 In February, the ANA Board of Directors formally acknowledged May 6, 1982 as "National Nurses Day." The action affirmed a joint resolution of the United States Congress designating May 6 as "National Recognition Day for Nurses."

1982 President Ronald Reagan signed a proclamation on March 25, proclaiming "National Recognition Day for Nurses" to be May 6, 1982.

1990 The ANA Board of Directors expanded the recognition of nurses to a week-long celebration, declaring May 6 - 12, 1991, as National Nurses Week.

1993 The ANA Board of Directors designated May 6 - 12 as permanent dates to observe National Nurses Week in 1994 and in all subsequent years.

1996 The ANA initiated "National RN Recognition Day" on May 6, 1996, to honor the nation's indispensable registered nurses for their tireless commitment 365 days a year. The ANA encourages its state and territorial nurses associations and other organizations to acknowledge May 6, 1996 as "National RN Recognition Day."

1997 The ANA Board of Directors, at the request of the National Student Nurses Association, designated May 8 as National Student Nurses Day.

Source: www.nursingworld.org

Welcome

 

Welcome to the MMHD Blog Site

 
Always Caring...Always Here
 
 
Here you will find posts about health care issues and more. Links to articles, tips, health stories, and happenings at MMHD will be the focus of this blog.
 
 
We look forward to providing you with useful information and resources.
 
 
 
Mayers Memorial Hospital District
43563 Hwy 299E
Fall River Mills, CA 96028
(530)336-5511